What’s in Assad’s DNA for Syria? More Destruction

SYRIA: FIGHTING CONTINUES DURING EID AL-ADHA HOLIDAY

QUESTION:  What’s to become of Syria now that Assad has announced he will not negotiate for peace?

ANSWER: What’s to become of Syria? Exactly what Assad wants to become of it. Gone.

He is like the jilted lover who kills his girlfriend because if he can’t have her, then nobody can. That is what Assad is doing to his country as he watches one Syrian town after another demolished by him or his opponents.

Who is this man who controls the lives of 15 million people, the fate of surrounding countries such as Turkey and Iran, and who positions Syria as the tinder box that could easily start a third world war?

Syria President Bashar Al-AssadBashar al Assad was his father’s second choice as heir to the country of Syria. His brother, Basil was destined to inherit his father’s country, but was killed in a car accident. Bashar was then called back from England where he was studying to become an ophthalmologist. He knew he was second choice, but getting a country was no doubt better than getting a medical degree.

Now many years later, and the dictatorial ruler as was his father, Bashar owns the country that is being torn apart. Last Sunday, in a prepared speech, he announced to the world that he would not negotiate with anybody who wanted to bring peace to his country.

So far, more than 60,000 people have died trying to take the country away from Bashar, and many have fled into neighboring countries such as Turkey and Iran to face a freezing winter in tents and with little or no food. SYRIA: LIFE ON THE FRONT LINES OF BATTLE FOR ALEPPO

Bashar al Assad has joined the many dictators who preferred to see their beloved countries completely destroyed, which I wrote about in my book, Tyrants in Our Time: Lives of 14 Dictators.

Egomaniacal dictators cannot separate themselves from their countries: they become their country, and if they are going to die, then so must their country.

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Bashar’s father, Hafiz Assad was the role model for his son. As is said, “The fruit does not fall far from the tree.”

When Hafiz first secured his power as president, he began his rule democratically, even bringing water and electricity to rural areas.

But in less than ten years, Hafiz went from being a determined idealist to a cruel tyrant, all because he could not tolerate any opposition.

APTOPIX Mideast Syria

As I quote from my book, “When, in 1982, the opposition to Hafiz took control of the town of Hama and called for a jihad against their president, Assad’s troops quelled the rebellion, destroying mosques and indiscriminately killing between 10,000 and 30,000 people.”

Hafiz’ son, Bashar, had a good lesson as a young man on how to handle opposition. He has no qualms killing his own people today, and as he says, he will not negotiate.

We must believe him. It’s in his DNA.

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About June Stephenson

June Stephenson is the author of 20 books about women’s issues, parental responsibility, the humanities, philosophy, comparative religion, music, architecture, parenting, sexual abuse, child abuse, spousal abuse, incest, crime, women’s studies, aging, tyranny, family, marriage, and divorce. The accomplished author has a degree from Stanford in economics and a Ph.D. in psychology with 25 years of teaching experience in history and English. Stephenson’s well-researched and documented approach combined with an easy-to-read style, offers readers enrichment and enjoyment. She also is an award-winning artist with many red ribbons from juried art shows throughout California. Stephenson has two daughters and two granddaughters, and lives in Palm Desert, California, with her Labradoddle named Happy.

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